Central Saint Martins BAGD: the course formerly known as graphic design?

Every year, the BA graphics degree show at Central Saint Martins (CSM) is a highlight of the degree show season. This year did not disappoint. Previously, the degree work has been grouped into the traditional silos of illustration, graphic design and advertising, yet this year we found ourselves navigating curated themes such as 'How does graphic communication (re)solve questions?'. We were encouraged by the social thinking exploration coming from the BA graphics course, and look forward to seeing how these designers develop. The following are some pieces that caught our eye when we went on the Industry event last week.

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This year's catalogue is nicely bound, not only with some neat sewing, but also with the themes of the show: 'How does graphic communication (re)solve problems?'; 'How do we find a voice in a commercial world?'; 'How do we (re)design who we are?'; 'Is technology leading us to Utopia or dystopia?'; 'How do we (re) materialise culture?'; 'What is wrong with design/society?'; 'How is reality formed by narratives?', and 'Should design impose order or chaos?'

Annemarieke Kloosterhof  explores cutting away cancer in paper form.

Annemarieke Kloosterhof explores cutting away cancer in paper form.

Amy Elms  shows that sitting down with a cuppa and some face time can defeat the disconnect of today's technological world.

Amy Elms shows that sitting down with a cuppa and some face time can defeat the disconnect of today's technological world.

Joshua Smith  aims to help people understand the Syrian conflict better.

Joshua Smith aims to help people understand the Syrian conflict better.

Phillipine Sohet 's clever mobile workshop idea invites mindfulness in a unique way.

Phillipine Sohet's clever mobile workshop idea invites mindfulness in a unique way.

Wen Yi Tseng  brings Taiwanese fairytales to the fore, whilst highlighting the international nature of the course's students.

Wen Yi Tseng brings Taiwanese fairytales to the fore, whilst highlighting the international nature of the course's students.

Georgia Cranstoun 's humorously titled book showed that the exuberance and experimentation traditionally associated with CSM students are not dead.

Georgia Cranstoun's humorously titled book showed that the exuberance and experimentation traditionally associated with CSM students are not dead.

Congratulations to all of the Central Saint Martins BA Graphics graduates on their amazing degree show this year!  I look forward to seeing you out in the industry. All of the students' work can be seen on their degree show page here.

 

Bright Lights, Big City

Lumiere London produced by Artichoke lights up the city with London's biggest-ever light festival. 30 installations by artists such as Julian Opie, Sarah Blood, Lab[au] and Jacques Rival are being showcased in locations such as King's Cross, Mayfair, Piccadilly, Regent Street, and Trafalgar Square during the four day festival. We went to check it out on the opening night.

Binary Waves by Lab[au]

Binary Waves

We were blown away by this installation by Lab[au]. Not only is it beautiful, but it uses, 'infrared sensors to capture the invisible flows of information that surround us from mobile phones, radios and cars.' While we were there, the big three meter tall lights seemed to follow us back and forth

Circus of Light

Circus of Light

The circus is coming to town. Ocubo brings it unto the facade of Central Saint Martins in King's Cross. Their engaging projection combines a colourful film of jugglers, acrobats and performers with the local residents. Hundreds of people lined up to view this fun-filled virtual performance.

Identified Flying Object

Identified Flying Object

Inside Jacques Rival's giant birdcage installation, there is a single swing inviting passersby to connect with their inner child, jump on and take off. It might seem a bit precarious to be swinging to new heights in the dark, but it was also quite thrilling.

Litre of light – Mick Stephenson, Central Saint Martins, UAL and Myshelter Foundation

MyShelter Foundation's low cost, high impact lighting solution of plastic bottles filled with water with a drop of bleach can refract as much sunlight through it as a 55-watt bulb. They have brought this simple idea to communities in developing countries and now it has been converted by Mick Stephenson and CSM students into an art installation exploring the themes of sustainability, climate change and issues of poverty.

Light Graffiti

Don't have a light sabre? Well, this could be the next best thing. Floating Pictures' interactive installation let's you run wild with a smartphone torch and create lines of light and colour literally as street art.

Lumiere London is running from 14 – 17 January. It's definitely worth checking out as it's free and fun to do. For further info and locations, check out Lumiere London's website